Where I’m headed in Nutrition

Where I’m headed in Nutrition

WUFF LAWDAMERCY School has been BUSY lately!

How have yall been?

Something on my mind lately- to be honest, it’s a little existential. When I first started my master’s program in nutrition to become a registered dietitian nutritionist (RDN), believe it or not…I had no desire to become a healthcare provider in the realm of GI. At all. No gastrointestinal grossness for me, please and thanks, especially with being a patient and all. NOPE. Hard pass.

But then.

I kept getting mad, honestly. I was mad that IBD and IBS were constantly categorized as one and the same- it would be like telling someone with type 1 diabetes that it was just like type 2. And then I got mad once I realized that we constantly fail our patients by giving them micronutrient infusions but then not ensuring they’re accessible….aka, “medically necessary” by insurance companies…aka Susan needs an iron infusion, and now she’s slapped with a big ass bill, because her insurance company isn’t covering it since it’s not a “medically necessary” pharmaceutical, so Susan stops her iron infusions short, and now we struggle to get her healed timely and optimally. I feel like as healthcare professionals we are stopping the care short by not ensuring that it’s extended and accessible for healing. ugh. Makes me…mad.

And then.

I started learning about energy nutrients (aka biochemistry for food, which sounds boring and disgusting, but meet mega-nerd Stacey. She loves this shit). I learned about all the different parts of the GI tract, where food is absorbed, how we can enhance bio-availability of certain nutrients by pairing them with others. And oh no- I liked it all.

What I’m saying is…I have decided to write my thesis over nutrition in Inflammatory Bowel Diseases (IBD), and I want to work with medically complex cases- GI diseases and the like… in the worst way. I need to think really hard, and GI diseases are tough to treat. They’re fascinating (I say this as a patient!) and terrible (see? still a patient!), and nutrition support is so, so crucial.



I also still want to write nutrition articles for endurance athletes for magazines. Ever since Andi Anderson on How to Lose a Guy in Ten Days, I can’t seem to shake the dream of working for a magazine, and I refuse to let my adult self out-grow that junior high school daydream. And I also want to consult for MLB teams, and I don’t care who you are; I can out-baseball talk you any day. Unless you’re a Yankees fan, in which case I doubt you’re a real fan of the game and would venture to guess that you’re only a fan of winning, and I can’t say that I blame ya…but boy, bye.
xoxo love ya forever, Houston Astros.

But that’s the cool magic of the nutrition field. I’m going to be able to piece-meal my career together so it doesn’t fit a conventional, boring mold.

All this has me thinking…oh boy.
In October 2012 when I was handed my diagnosis of moderate to severe ulcerative colitis, it’s like a new life began for me. My thought process shifted, and I became more tender, softer, empathetic, stronger, thicker, resilient, and driven. I 100% do not believe everything happens for a reason, but I’m oddly thankful for an unfortunate diagnosis forcing me to be a vulnerable patient in a flawed heath care system. If I can’t change it, I deeply hope I can bring some light to it (I’m not entirely naive here; I’ve worked in healthcare- just hopeful).

And in the meantime, I’ll write a boring thesis that asks thoughtful questions and has a few hopeful answers for the future of GI diseases.
I’m excited.

And I’ll be rooting for the ‘Stros.

And for you!

-Stacey







^Post Hurricane Harvey at Houston Methodist Hospital

P.S. Posting pictures of Houston like I know where I’m headed…but I HAVE NO IDEA where I’m headed. Just along for the ride!

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