Where I’m headed in Nutrition

WUFF LAWDAMERCY School has been BUSY lately!

How have yall been?

Something on my mind lately- to be honest, it’s a little existential. When I first started my master’s program in nutrition to become a registered dietitian nutritionist (RDN), believe it or not…I had no desire to become a healthcare provider in the realm of GI. At all. No gastrointestinal grossness for me, please and thanks, especially with being a patient and all. NOPE. Hard pass.

But then.

I kept getting mad, honestly. I was mad that IBD and IBS were constantly categorized as one and the same- it would be like telling someone with type 1 diabetes that it was just like type 2. And then I got mad once I realized that we constantly fail our patients by giving them micronutrient infusions but then not ensuring they’re accessible….aka, “medically necessary” by insurance companies…aka Susan needs an iron infusion, and now she’s slapped with a big ass bill, because her insurance company isn’t covering it since it’s not a “medically necessary” pharmaceutical, so Susan stops her iron infusions short, and now we struggle to get her healed timely and optimally. I feel like as healthcare professionals we are stopping the care short by not ensuring that it’s extended and accessible for healing. ugh. Makes me…mad.

And then.

I started learning about energy nutrients (aka biochemistry for food, which sounds boring and disgusting, but meet mega-nerd Stacey. She loves this shit). I learned about all the different parts of the GI tract, where food is absorbed, how we can enhance bio-availability of certain nutrients by pairing them with others. And oh no- I liked it all.

What I’m saying is…I have decided to write my thesis over nutrition in Inflammatory Bowel Diseases (IBD), and I want to work with medically complex cases- GI diseases and the like… in the worst way. I need to think really hard, and GI diseases are tough to treat. They’re fascinating (I say this as a patient!) and terrible (see? still a patient!), and nutrition support is so, so crucial.



I also still want to write nutrition articles for endurance athletes for magazines. Ever since Andi Anderson on How to Lose a Guy in Ten Days, I can’t seem to shake the dream of working for a magazine, and I refuse to let my adult self out-grow that junior high school daydream. And I also want to consult for MLB teams, and I don’t care who you are; I can out-baseball talk you any day. Unless you’re a Yankees fan, in which case I doubt you’re a real fan of the game and would venture to guess that you’re only a fan of winning, and I can’t say that I blame ya…but boy, bye.
xoxo love ya forever, Houston Astros.

But that’s the cool magic of the nutrition field. I’m going to be able to piece-meal my career together so it doesn’t fit a conventional, boring mold.

All this has me thinking…oh boy.
In October 2012 when I was handed my diagnosis of moderate to severe ulcerative colitis, it’s like a new life began for me. My thought process shifted, and I became more tender, softer, empathetic, stronger, thicker, resilient, and driven. I 100% do not believe everything happens for a reason, but I’m oddly thankful for an unfortunate diagnosis forcing me to be a vulnerable patient in a flawed heath care system. If I can’t change it, I deeply hope I can bring some light to it (I’m not entirely naive here; I’ve worked in healthcare- just hopeful).

And in the meantime, I’ll write a boring thesis that asks thoughtful questions and has a few hopeful answers for the future of GI diseases.
I’m excited.

And I’ll be rooting for the ‘Stros.

And for you!

-Stacey







^Post Hurricane Harvey at Houston Methodist Hospital

P.S. Posting pictures of Houston like I know where I’m headed…but I HAVE NO IDEA where I’m headed. Just along for the ride!

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Colonoscopy Prep: 6 Ways To Make it Suck Less

Hi, Friends!

I’m willing to bet your day has been exponentially more
fun than mine, although I do consider myself to be a chaser of silver linings and an eternal optimist…so it’s still a tossup.

Also, I am fully aware of how rainbows and unicornsy that sounds, but I’m unapologetically happy most days, eternally running through flower fields.

Today is prep day, and I don’t mean meal prep.

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Colonoscopy at 7am tomorrow at the new (for me) med center with a new doc. New places and people, but same dreaded prep juice.

So I’m talking about things that no one talks about today: Colonoscopies. I fully believe there would be cures nearly available for Crohn’s disease, ulcerative colitis, and a host of other autoimmune diseases if they were easier to talk about. I’m not victim-blaming the patients; Disease and all its glam and glitz does stuff to your psyche. Being real about poop and achy joints and weight fluctuation and j-pouches and ostomys and stomas. ugh. Just tough stuff to talk about…
…unless you’re in the middle of a store with a “no public restroom” sign and you’re suddenly about to be sick  crap yourself uncontrollably. In that case you drop all your reservations at the door, announce to the store owner that you’re “about to be really sick and it is a medical emergency that you use their private bathroom,” and then you discuss having a “digestive disease” while you check out moments later. G-l-a-m-o-r-o-u-s. P.S. Can you please consider advocating for research while you hand me my receipt, even though I look completely normal like there’s nothing wrong with me at all, except for now you know that I have a digestive disease? Thanks 🙂

^Real life situation, by the way…happened on my honeymoon.

How to make colonoscopies suck less as told by a 20something year old:

1. Be creative. If your prep SUCKS (spoiler alert: It probably will), mix it with cold ginger ale or 7up. Your prep will say something like, “Mix with water.” Believe me, mix it with something carbonated, too. If you normally don’t drink sodas (neither do I), today isn’t a bad day to break that rule.

2. Listen to hype music if it’s your first time to chug prep. Don’t take it all solemn and serious. I suggest the classy ballad “shots” by LMFAO.

3. Ice chips, sometimes blended with a little bit of lime gatorade and fresh-squeezed lime juice isn’t a bad “meal” at all. Eat it with a spoon. mmm.

4. Water. Lots and lots. Just when you think you’ve had enough, maybe have a sip more.

5. Really hot showers. The stuff dreams are made of.

6. Netflix and chill. Enjoy this day for all that it is: a big ole rest day. Wear fuzzy socks.

Hope you’re having a good day, wherever you are!

Tomorrow, I’m going to have the biggest (low FODMAP compliant) taco I’ve ever SEEN.

Keep moving forward 🙂

-Stacey

Shoutout to Zack, who is the best a girl could ask for.


This is The Remix to Remission

Hi, friends! Hope you’re having a great Wednesday!

I’ve been seeing a lot of encouraging posts from my friends on Instagram along the lines of, “Keep persevering! The good stuff is right around the corner.” And “I hated the first hard four miles of my run today, but I kept enduring, and by mile five I felt rejuvenated.” These have been especially uplifting to me, because sometimes I feel like I’m aimlessly floundering, but I think I really needed to hear, “Keep it up.” It’s so easy to feel uninspired or beaten down by our own critical thoughts, but these “atta girls” really helped put a pep in my step. I’m not even sure what “pep in my step” means, but they made me feel good. Okay. Moving on.

Recently…

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…we made friends with the neighbors. Meet Kitty (aka “Minnie the Moocher”). We think she was abandoned. I took her to the vet to ensure she wasn’t microchipped (she wasn’t), and I called every shelter in town to see if an orange pretty kitty had been reported missing (she hadn’t), and then I harassed all my friends and family to see if they’d keep her (they wouldn’t), so I got really sad, and Zack and I took her to a [NO-KILL] shelter today.

She is incredibly friendly and always wants us to bring her inside (we never caved). She follows us from room to room by sitting on our outdoor window sills. But tonight we have a blast of below freezing temps headed our way, so we hope we are giving her the promise of a better life by taking her to a shelter. I’m sad that we aren’t allowed to have animals with our lease (other than Jaxon, who only won his way into the lease by me labeling him as a “deaf, furry goldfish”).

I’m so thankful to have met Kitty, though. We didn’t think we were cat people. Now we have labeled ourselves as “Animal People”. I hope she finds a loving home!

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Jaxon is ready for the cold front.

In other news I started a low FODMAPs elimination diet recommended by my GI doc.

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Shoutout to grill master Zack who grilled these sweet potato fries and venison “burgers”. They were good.

About two years after my diagnosis I began researching and learning about which foods trigger my symptoms and add to inflammation, and incorporating more fibrous foods, fruits rich in phytochemicals and antioxidants (e.g. blueberries), and healthy fats (e.g. avocado and salmon) in my diet. Somewhere along my journey I lost focus a bit, and I’ve been eating “whatever” lately because I don’t understand my changing triggers and symptoms, and to be honest, I just got tired.

But I have an inflammatory bowel disease (Crohn’s). I can’t keep eating foods (e.g. sugar, salt) that trigger inflammation –> symptoms. About 80% of the immune system is IN your gut (large and small intestines), so try to eat well, even it you are completely healthy! So here I am, fueling well again.

My ultimate goals for this year: Remission and increase in energy levels.

Even if I don’t reach remission, I don’t want it to be my fault. I don’t want it to be my own lack of discipline and giving into my own cravings that prevents me from remission. I’m going to fight for it again. Today, that looks like low FODMAPs. In six weeks, I hope to know which grains and sugars are specific triggers.

I should also add that I DO NOT believe in dieting to lose weight. Hopping on a trend, and then catapulting off into unhealthy eating habits doesn’t make sense to me. Learning is critical to incorporate healthy, lifelong habits, indulging when it’s okay (without beating yourself up), and then making conscious efforts to maintain a balanced diet most of the time. I think dieting messes with one’s psyche and cultivates an unhealthy relationship with food, which can even lead to metabolism problems later in life if you’re calorie restricting without supervision from a dietitian or doctor. Okay, jumping off my soapbox now.

I think the lesson for me that is to be learned today is that it’s okay that I got frustrated (and at times even let Crohn’s get the best of me), because I’m persevering. I’m sticking to my list of foods from the doc, and I’m not compromising (no matter how loud Nestle Tollhouse chocolate lovers cookie dough calls my name that time of the month). I’m learning through this challenge, and I know I’ll come out stronger…and hopefully smarter.

Keep moving forward. 🙂

-Stacey

Are you a dog or a cat person? An animal person? Any low FODMAPs advice?